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Using Rocket tools to install Open source products for z/OS USS


#1

Hi,

I’m a long-time z/OS sysprog, a fairly decent knowledge of Linux & USS (with shell scripting and Perl etc) but new to compiling open-source products from their source.

I’d like to get the open source product Graphviz (www.graphviz.org) running under USS just so I can use it’s command-line facilities.

Does anyone have any advice about how to start and would the Rocket tools Autoconf and Automake help?

Thanks,

Steve


#2

Hi, Steve. I suspect that you will find starting from automake/autoconf to be a difficult and frustrating process, but it’s worth a shot.

If you have access to a Linux system (either x86 or Linux on z), a somewhat easier, but much more ad hoc, approach might be something like this:

  • Clone the sources. It looks like GraphViz uses git submodules, which have their own quirks; the graphviz developer instructions should guide you through that.
  • Build GraphViz on that Linux system, which will create a configure script and, from that, the necessary Makefile.
  • Take the generated Makefile and sources, copy it all to z/OS, and start hacking.

We (Rocket) are working on getting the whole automake/autoconf/libtool chain working more reliably, but it’s not entirely there yet.

– Jerry


#3

Hi Jerry,

Sorry for ignoring this for so long. Thanks for taking the time to write this - I’m going to try and build this on my Mac (would that be OK?) and see how I get on.

As I’ve never built anything on Linux (but I’m familiar with the compile/link concepts from plenty of experience on z/OS) what sort of hacking might be required?

Have you found any open source tools that simply cannot be compiled to run under USS?

Regards,

Steve


#4

It’s not so much that things can’t be compiled; rather, it’s difficult to get to the point of even starting the build. The xlc compiler’s command line processing and options are very different from the more common gcc/clang. There is not full support for C++11 (though there aren’t THAT many tools that require C++), and of course the ASCII/EBCDIC issue hangs over everything.

Much of what we do at Rocket isn’t just getting code to compile, but getting it to work well in the context of z/OS.